A PATTERN OF CHANGE: Investing in Job Skills Instead of Juvenile Detention.  Philanthropy can play a major role in encouraging breakthrough social change, but breakthroughs often require a bit of risk. In the case of   Youth Advocate Programs   (YAP), philanthropy in cooperation with the judicial system launched a pilot of the first “pay for success” model in Central Indiana. Philanthropic investments of $800,000 dollars helped nearly 50 youths improve their lives. By comparison, it would have cost the State of Indiana more than $1.6 million dollars to incarcerate those youth. The proven cost savings combined with positive outcomes for youth led the Department of Child Services (DCS) to contract with YAP for the remainder of this fiscal year.    YAP has been working with youth on probation in Marion County since January 2016. The main goals of the YAP pilot were to: --Provide community-based services and supports that are tailored to the unique needs, strengths and interests of the youth and their family. --Act as an alternative to commitment or placement for moderate to high-risk youth, and reduce the number of residential bed days (incarceration) paid by the State of Indiana’s DCS used for Marion County youth.  YAP provided services to youth and their families including but not limited to supported (paid) work, educational advocacy, mentoring, crisis management and safety planning. Of the youth served, 81% connected with school and/or work. YAP contributed to a reduction of nearly 40% in DCS incarceration of youth during the first 12 months of the pilot. The cost savings for the state was more than double what was projected and stipulated in the initial contract. Juvenile court judges and the probation department have developed confidence that YAP offers a young person an opportunity to change his or her life.   The Clowes Fund awarded $40K, a small grant used for supported work stipends, a core component of YAP, which was added to the significant funding from the Annie E. Casey Foundation and Lilly Endowment.     (In the image, a vital and unique part of the YAP model is connecting youth in positive ways to their communities based on their particular interests and strengths.  An example of this principle in practice is illustrated through the story of EJ, pictured above.  EJ was nominated by YAP Program Director Gabe Grady and chosen to participate in the Indianapolis Black Congressional Forum at the Statehouse. Through that experience, EJ was able to use his personal experience and interest to advocate for increasing public safety by reducing youth incarceration, recidivism and violence in the community.)

A PATTERN OF CHANGE: Investing in Job Skills Instead of Juvenile Detention. Philanthropy can play a major role in encouraging breakthrough social change, but breakthroughs often require a bit of risk. In the case of Youth Advocate Programs (YAP), philanthropy in cooperation with the judicial system launched a pilot of the first “pay for success” model in Central Indiana. Philanthropic investments of $800,000 dollars helped nearly 50 youths improve their lives. By comparison, it would have cost the State of Indiana more than $1.6 million dollars to incarcerate those youth. The proven cost savings combined with positive outcomes for youth led the Department of Child Services (DCS) to contract with YAP for the remainder of this fiscal year. 

YAP has been working with youth on probation in Marion County since January 2016. The main goals of the YAP pilot were to:
--Provide community-based services and supports that are tailored to the unique needs, strengths and interests of the youth and their family.
--Act as an alternative to commitment or placement for moderate to high-risk youth, and reduce the number of residential bed days (incarceration) paid by the State of Indiana’s DCS used for Marion County youth.

YAP provided services to youth and their families including but not limited to supported (paid) work, educational advocacy, mentoring, crisis management and safety planning. Of the youth served, 81% connected with school and/or work. YAP contributed to a reduction of nearly 40% in DCS incarceration of youth during the first 12 months of the pilot. The cost savings for the state was more than double what was projected and stipulated in the initial contract. Juvenile court judges and the probation department have developed confidence that YAP offers a young person an opportunity to change his or her life. 

The Clowes Fund awarded $40K, a small grant used for supported work stipends, a core component of YAP, which was added to the significant funding from the Annie E. Casey Foundation and Lilly Endowment.  

(In the image, a vital and unique part of the YAP model is connecting youth in positive ways to their communities based on their particular interests and strengths. An example of this principle in practice is illustrated through the story of EJ, pictured above. EJ was nominated by YAP Program Director Gabe Grady and chosen to participate in the Indianapolis Black Congressional Forum at the Statehouse. Through that experience, EJ was able to use his personal experience and interest to advocate for increasing public safety by reducing youth incarceration, recidivism and violence in the community.)

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       A PATTERN OF CHANGE: Creating a Diverse Pipeline of Tech Workers.  Boston-area tech firms struggle to fill job openings. The tech workforce is largely homogenous with too few women and too few people of color. Employers regularly use a four-year degree as a proxy for job skills but lament the lack of critical thinking and communication skills among entry-level workers. Clowes Fund grantee   SkillWorks  , a public-private partnership with the dual mission of helping low-skill, low-income individuals attain family-supporting jobs and helping employers find and retain skilled employees, considered the state of the regional tech sector and asked, “Why not Boston youth and young adults?”   After a careful  review of the sector , SkillWorks convened a roundtable of area employers and identified entry-level jobs that are accessible to well-trained applicants who have not completed a four-year degree, offer strong starting wages and benefits and have a clear path to career advancement. Based on that review, SkillWorks invested $1 million in strategies that will expand apprenticeship opportunities in the industry, prepare adult learners for careers in the health care information technology field, help a major financial services company create career paths for non-traditional employees, create a pipeline for cyber security analysts and train youth in the latest web development skills. In total, these strategies will help 350 diverse youth and young adults participate in industry internships and 130 job seekers find a good job in the tech sector.  In doing so, SkillWorks will not only change the career and financial trajectory of hundreds of local youth and young adults, but also change the face of the region’s tech sector.     (In the image, students at SkillWorks’ partner Resilient Coders learn the latest web development skills.)

A PATTERN OF CHANGE: Creating a Diverse Pipeline of Tech Workers. Boston-area tech firms struggle to fill job openings. The tech workforce is largely homogenous with too few women and too few people of color. Employers regularly use a four-year degree as a proxy for job skills but lament the lack of critical thinking and communication skills among entry-level workers. Clowes Fund grantee SkillWorks, a public-private partnership with the dual mission of helping low-skill, low-income individuals attain family-supporting jobs and helping employers find and retain skilled employees, considered the state of the regional tech sector and asked, “Why not Boston youth and young adults?” 

After a careful review of the sector, SkillWorks convened a roundtable of area employers and identified entry-level jobs that are accessible to well-trained applicants who have not completed a four-year degree, offer strong starting wages and benefits and have a clear path to career advancement. Based on that review, SkillWorks invested $1 million in strategies that will expand apprenticeship opportunities in the industry, prepare adult learners for careers in the health care information technology field, help a major financial services company create career paths for non-traditional employees, create a pipeline for cyber security analysts and train youth in the latest web development skills. In total, these strategies will help 350 diverse youth and young adults participate in industry internships and 130 job seekers find a good job in the tech sector.  In doing so, SkillWorks will not only change the career and financial trajectory of hundreds of local youth and young adults, but also change the face of the region’s tech sector.  

(In the image, students at SkillWorks’ partner Resilient Coders learn the latest web development skills.)
 

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       FOSTERING RELATIONSHIPS TO LEVERAGE IMPACT.  Seattle is known for its vibrant arts scene, yet some children remain at a disadvantage with regard to access and opportunities. The Clowes Fund has fostered collaboration among its cohort of grantees who are working to ensure that all Seattle school children have creative advantages, especially hands-on access to musical instruments.    Seattle Youth Symphony Orchestras   (SYSO) and   Seattle Repertory Jazz Orchestra   (SRJO) are shining examples of savvy collaboration to maximize impact. Together they applied for and received a $250,000 grant from the Raynier Foundation for a three-year Musical Pathways project. SYSO’s Kathleen Allen led the charge. She and Susan Jenkins of SRJO said they developed trust, a shared vision among the Clowes cohort of grantees, which ultimately resulted in a joint effort and funding that will help them stabilize and expand the instrumental music continuum for middle and high school students in Southwest Seattle.

FOSTERING RELATIONSHIPS TO LEVERAGE IMPACT. Seattle is known for its vibrant arts scene, yet some children remain at a disadvantage with regard to access and opportunities. The Clowes Fund has fostered collaboration among its cohort of grantees who are working to ensure that all Seattle school children have creative advantages, especially hands-on access to musical instruments. 

Seattle Youth Symphony Orchestras (SYSO) and Seattle Repertory Jazz Orchestra (SRJO) are shining examples of savvy collaboration to maximize impact. Together they applied for and received a $250,000 grant from the Raynier Foundation for a three-year Musical Pathways project. SYSO’s Kathleen Allen led the charge. She and Susan Jenkins of SRJO said they developed trust, a shared vision among the Clowes cohort of grantees, which ultimately resulted in a joint effort and funding that will help them stabilize and expand the instrumental music continuum for middle and high school students in Southwest Seattle.

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