COLLABORATIONS AT WORK.   When New England Program Officer Megan Reilly sits with nonprofit leaders working on behalf of immigrant advancement, two things are clear: vulnerable immigrants are scared, and the organizations that support them are stretched thin.  The Clowes Fund works with like-minded funders to find ways to bolster these organizations.  Doing this work in partnership means not only more money, but also a statement that philanthropy is committed to immigrants and the well-being of organizations on the front lines of immigration policy.  The Fund made two small but potentially powerful collaborative grants to strengthen nonprofits: $5K to the Solidarity Fund at   Maine Initiatives   and $10K to the   Social Innovation Forum   in Massachusetts.    In response to public policy trends that seem unwelcoming to immigrants, our colleagues at Maine Initiatives raised $50K in rapid-response funding from foundations and individuals to support the Solidarity Fund for immigrant-led, grassroots organizations; 12 organizations received unrestricted grants of $4K to use however they needed.  In Massachusetts, the Fund and seven partners made grants to the Social Innovation Forum, which will select one promising nonprofit that serves immigrants and refugees as a Social Innovator to receive 24 months of intensive organizational support, as well as six other organizations to participate in a condensed version of the Accelerator program.  All of these organizations will benefit from new communications tools, executive coaching and connections to a network of potential supporters.    By no means is this work complete!  The Clowes Fund will continue to align with partners to strengthen the nonprofit safety net for immigrants, refugees and asylum-seekers.

COLLABORATIONS AT WORK.  When New England Program Officer Megan Reilly sits with nonprofit leaders working on behalf of immigrant advancement, two things are clear: vulnerable immigrants are scared, and the organizations that support them are stretched thin.  The Clowes Fund works with like-minded funders to find ways to bolster these organizations.  Doing this work in partnership means not only more money, but also a statement that philanthropy is committed to immigrants and the well-being of organizations on the front lines of immigration policy.  The Fund made two small but potentially powerful collaborative grants to strengthen nonprofits: $5K to the Solidarity Fund at Maine Initiatives and $10K to the Social Innovation Forum in Massachusetts.  

In response to public policy trends that seem unwelcoming to immigrants, our colleagues at Maine Initiatives raised $50K in rapid-response funding from foundations and individuals to support the Solidarity Fund for immigrant-led, grassroots organizations; 12 organizations received unrestricted grants of $4K to use however they needed.  In Massachusetts, the Fund and seven partners made grants to the Social Innovation Forum, which will select one promising nonprofit that serves immigrants and refugees as a Social Innovator to receive 24 months of intensive organizational support, as well as six other organizations to participate in a condensed version of the Accelerator program.  All of these organizations will benefit from new communications tools, executive coaching and connections to a network of potential supporters.  

By no means is this work complete!  The Clowes Fund will continue to align with partners to strengthen the nonprofit safety net for immigrants, refugees and asylum-seekers.

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       PARTNERS LIGHTING THE PATH.   Collaborative efforts provide many benefits to participating members, including opportunities to raise awareness and to encourage unified community effort.  Although not a current grantee, The Clowes Fund staff is glad for the opportunity to work with the   Coalition for Our Immigrant Neighbors   (COIN) toward common interests.  COIN is a newly developed coalition of service providers with a broad idea of working together to facilitate and coordinate community efforts to provide legal, psychological and other services for immigrants in Central Indiana.  Current COIN members that are also Fund grantees are   Exodus Refugee Immigration  ,   Neighborhood Christian Legal Clinic  ,   La Plaza   and   Immigrant Welcome Center  .     Thus far, COIN members have worked to provide Family Safety Plan Clinics, estate planning in partnership with Exodus, and seminars on Temporary Protected Status in response to current needs.  In July, COIN hosted a refugee resettlement simulation “Walk a Mile in a Refugee’s Shoes,” which provided an estimated 500 attendees with a better understanding of the refugee experience and an opportunity to get involved.  The Fund is supporting COIN’s efforts to benefit grantee organizations and the immigrant and refugee community in Indianapolis, not with a grant but by helping convene the monthly meetings to promote COIN’s vision of a Central Indiana professional community responsive to the unique needs of our immigrant population.  (In the image, Fund Program Assistant Estherre Wohlenhaus (far right) participates in a COIN partners meeting.)

PARTNERS LIGHTING THE PATH.  Collaborative efforts provide many benefits to participating members, including opportunities to raise awareness and to encourage unified community effort.  Although not a current grantee, The Clowes Fund staff is glad for the opportunity to work with the Coalition for Our Immigrant Neighbors (COIN) toward common interests.  COIN is a newly developed coalition of service providers with a broad idea of working together to facilitate and coordinate community efforts to provide legal, psychological and other services for immigrants in Central Indiana.  Current COIN members that are also Fund grantees are Exodus Refugee Immigration, Neighborhood Christian Legal Clinic, La Plaza and Immigrant Welcome Center

Thus far, COIN members have worked to provide Family Safety Plan Clinics, estate planning in partnership with Exodus, and seminars on Temporary Protected Status in response to current needs.  In July, COIN hosted a refugee resettlement simulation “Walk a Mile in a Refugee’s Shoes,” which provided an estimated 500 attendees with a better understanding of the refugee experience and an opportunity to get involved.

The Fund is supporting COIN’s efforts to benefit grantee organizations and the immigrant and refugee community in Indianapolis, not with a grant but by helping convene the monthly meetings to promote COIN’s vision of a Central Indiana professional community responsive to the unique needs of our immigrant population.  (In the image, Fund Program Assistant Estherre Wohlenhaus (far right) participates in a COIN partners meeting.)

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       FOSTERING RELATIONSHIPS TO LEVERAGE IMPACT.  Seattle is known for its vibrant arts scene, yet some children remain at a disadvantage with regard to access and opportunities. The Clowes Fund has fostered collaboration among its cohort of grantees who are working to ensure that all Seattle school children have creative advantages, especially hands-on access to musical instruments.    Seattle Youth Symphony Orchestras   (SYSO) and   Seattle Repertory Jazz Orchestra   (SRJO) are shining examples of savvy collaboration to maximize impact. Together they applied for and received a $250,000 grant from the Raynier Foundation for a three-year Musical Pathways project. SYSO’s Kathleen Allen led the charge. She and Susan Jenkins of SRJO said they developed trust, a shared vision among the Clowes cohort of grantees, which ultimately resulted in a joint effort and funding that will help them stabilize and expand the instrumental music continuum for middle and high school students in Southwest Seattle.

FOSTERING RELATIONSHIPS TO LEVERAGE IMPACT. Seattle is known for its vibrant arts scene, yet some children remain at a disadvantage with regard to access and opportunities. The Clowes Fund has fostered collaboration among its cohort of grantees who are working to ensure that all Seattle school children have creative advantages, especially hands-on access to musical instruments. 

Seattle Youth Symphony Orchestras (SYSO) and Seattle Repertory Jazz Orchestra (SRJO) are shining examples of savvy collaboration to maximize impact. Together they applied for and received a $250,000 grant from the Raynier Foundation for a three-year Musical Pathways project. SYSO’s Kathleen Allen led the charge. She and Susan Jenkins of SRJO said they developed trust, a shared vision among the Clowes cohort of grantees, which ultimately resulted in a joint effort and funding that will help them stabilize and expand the instrumental music continuum for middle and high school students in Southwest Seattle.

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